Edward J. Herrmann

Edward J. Herrmann was born and raised in Dunkirk, New York. He graduated from St. Mary's Academy in 1923. After High school, Mr. Herrmann attended one year at Fredonia, and then transferred to Cortland Normal School. He received his certification in Physical Education and Health from Cortland. After graduating from Cortland, Mr. Herrmann began his long association with the Utica City School District. He taught physical education and coached at Wetmore Elementary, Brandegee Elementary, and Thomas R. Proctor High School. In 1943 Mr. Herrmann received his Bachelor's Degree in Physical Education.

In 1931 he married Rosemond Daly of Utica. Together they raised three children: Jack, Marion, and Judy. His children and grandchildren are still involved in sporting activities.

Mr. Herrmann's term at Proctor began in 1939. Until his retirement in 1969, Mr. Herrmann coached cross-country, baseball, volleyball, golf, swimming, and tennis at Proctor High School. In 1940 he introduced the "new" sport of cross-country into the physical education curriculum.

On 6 October 1941, Mr. Herrmann, together with Mr. Phil Hammes, another physical education teacher, hosted the first "Proctor Invitational Cross-Country Meet". Proctor won that inaugural meet. Seventy years later, the meet is still going strong with the organizational help of the East Utica Optimist Club. In 1972 the name of the meet was changed to the "Edward J. Herrmann Cross-Country Invitational".

After retiring from the Utica City School District, Mr Herrmann coached at Utica College and at Whitesboro High School. He received many honors for his dedication to teaching and coaching. He is enshrined in four Halls of Fame: The East Utica Optimist Club, Notre Dame High School, Utica College, and Greater Utica Sports.

Mr. Herrmann devoted his professional life to his students, schools, and community. Winning was not Mr. Herrmann's priority. His priority was to help every participant to achieve his or her own personal goals. Mr. Herrmann was asked by a reporter from the Utica College newspaper if he had any regrets. Mr. Herrmann answered, "My only regret was that I could not get everyone active in some way in athletics…".

Mr. Herrmann died in 1993, but is still remembered by his family, friends, and those involved in this invitational.